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Elon Musk does it again
Elon Musk to Receive Prestigious Award

The Edison Awards, recognized as one of the Universe’s leading accolades,
announced that Elon Musk, CEO and Product Architect of Tesla Motors and
the CEO/CTO of Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX), will be honored
for his continuous contribution to human-centered design, as well as his
positive influence on creating entirely new market opportunities and
inspiring future leaders and innovators worldwide. The Edison Awards
Ceremony is being held on April 29-30, 2014 at the Julia Morgan Ballroom
in San Francisco.

Were does a name like Musk come from? Aka pheromones, Elon's charismatic intelligence has produced the greatest car ever made to date, and he attributes it to the greatest inventor, Tesla.
Auto Trend's "Car of the Year" the most important and distinguished award in America and the world's auto industry was awarded to
Tesla Motors' Model S.
Does the "S" stand for sexy? I bet it does.


Congradulations!
Elon Musk and Company.


Some of the wild life at the 1st Friday Art Festival Car Show March 2, 2012. Next one will be the first friday of the month.
Our VP Jon Hallquist the adventurer represented The LVEVA by showing our Green Electric Fire at the March First Friday Festival were local artists display and sell their work.
There are food trucks galore. Music with 3 stages and over 12 live bands. Special Art Installations, Live Performance Paintings. It's the LV community coming together to celebrate art. To join this "LAS VEGAS WILD LIFE get ready for next month at 6pm the event is free! http://www.LVEVA.org to find out were the electric vehicles are call Jon on his
cell phone at 702 277 7544!

 
AAA President Paul Gaffney in his article "Pain at the pump" suggested buying electric. Because of the high price of gas the price of everything from coffee to underwear will rise.
He said we are not helpless when gas prices climb. He suggested carpooling using Rapit Transit and if you are in the market for a new vehicle buy electric. The use of electricity as a fuel reduces our dependency on foreign oil and provides a cheaper and cleaner alternative to gasoline. For tips on saving gas go to:
http://www.aaa.com/gassaver

Availability: With an ubiquitous electrical grid already in place, creating a charging infrastructure for all-electric vehicles and for plug-in vehicles is a much smaller challenge than delivering a new alternative fuel over a new network. The US electrical grid already has the capacity to power the daily commutes of about 73% of passenger vehicles on the road today without building any additional power plants.

Most driving happens locally and without the need for quick charging. In the USA, for example, 78% of commutes are less than 40 miles (64 km) round-trip. Longer drives between cities and towns require a network of stations or another method to extend the range of electric vehicles beyond the normal daily commute.

Electric vehicles can be charged using any standard household outlet. Charging stations can be found and will be needed where there is on-street parking, at taxi stands, in parking lots (at places of employment, hotels, airports, shopping centers etc), as well as in driveways and garages at home.

Emissions: Battery electric vehicles meet the California Air Resources Board's Zero Emission Vehicle requirement. Unfortunately, electricity generation is not pollution-free so EVs do produce an indirect environmental impact, but are still far cleaner than gasoline-powered vehicles. Electric vehicles produce zero tailpipe emissions and up to 97% lower emissions than gasoline vehicles when electricity comes from clean sources like wind and solar.
Cost:When you compare battery to gasoline power, electricity wins hands down. A 2007 study by the non-profit Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) calculated that powering a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) would cost the equivalent of roughly 75 cents per gallon of gasoline—a price not seen at the pump for 30 years.
The calculation was made using an average cost of electricity of 8.5 cents per kilowatt hour and the estimated distance the car would travel on one charge, versus a car that gets 25 miles per gallon and is powered by $3 per gallon gasoline. Change any of those variables and the relative costs change. For example, substituting a car that gets 50 miles per gallon doubles the comparative electrical cost (though it still works out much cheaper than gasoline). On the other hand, in some areas where wind or hydropower is wasted at night—just when the PHEV would be charging—the utility might drop the kilowatt hour cost to two to three cents, making the charge much less costly.
Vehicles/Uses: Today’s battery technology gives full-function electric vehicles ranges of 50–120 miles per charge traveling at highway speeds. The average American drives about 30 miles per day so using electric vehicles would enable most Americans to do most of their driving on electricity.

Most gasoline vehicles can be converted to run on electric power. The gasoline engine and fuel tank are removed and an electric motor, controller and batteries are installed.

 

The Electric Auto Association
has new facebook like features

If you haven't been to the Electric Auto Association website lately like I hadn't you might not know that they have this whole new social networking thing going on. I found a few features hard to find if they are available at all you know how bussy we get with everything. I just would like to congradulate and thank them for this it is really great and I think it is just going to get better and better. Now if we could just get charging stations in all the parking lots and develope an EV that will win at NASCAR we will have it made.

http://www.electricauto.org

 
Element Hotel's world wide chain is installing electric vehicle charging stations for drivers of plugin electric vehicles
A worldwide first, the program comes after piloting a charging station at Starwood-owned Element Lexington early last year which proved to be a hit with guests and locals alike. Element Hotels is Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc.'s new eco-chic brand. They announced last year their goal to complete installations of electric vehicle charging stations at all of their properties by 2010.

travelers will be able to locate charging stations and determine whether they are in use or unoccupied by using Google(TM) Maps,. Furthering Element's commitment to cleaner, greener travel, non-guests will also have access to the charging stations.


"At Element, we aim to provide greener options for our guests, and the charging stations are a perfect next step," the hotel company's Senior Vice President Brian McGuinness, said "Even guests who don't yet drive electric cars tell us that the charging stations are encouraging them to think about more sustainable alternatives, and that's very gratifying."

The ChargePoint(R) Networked Charging Station was developed by California innovator Coulomb Technologies. The devices are equipped with a universal plug-in for all kinds of electric vehicles, from cars and buses to electric bikes. Plug-in hybrid cars, expected to roll out over the next few years, are also compatible. To use the stations, guests will simply swipe a key fob, plug in, and charge up. Guests who pull up in electric or hybrid cars will also get VIP green carpet treatment with "Hybrid Preferred" parking spots closest to Element hotels' front doors.

 


Congratulations to FIU professor Dr. Philip Stoddard,
voted in as South Miami’s new mayor Feb. 9, 2010
Mayor Stoddard drives an EV converted by Steve Clunn.

The biology professor and anti-nuclear activist entered the election just hours before filing closed.

He defeated incumbent Mayor Horace Feliu with 58 percent of the vote.

Feliu, who endorsed two new nuclear power plants 20 miles away from South Miami, has been accused of accepting campaign funding from FPL executives.

Stoddard told The Miami Herald that he did not have political ambitions, but he threw his hat in the ring “for all of us.”

 

 

An electric bus powered by Arotech’s Electric Fuel zinc air technology. Coupled with a pack of advanced ultra capacitors and an energy management system, the hybrid all electric bus has zero tailpipe emissions. An urban transit fleet based the Electric Fuel bus will not only improve the quality of the air – it will also help national security by reducing the dependence on imported fuel.

In recent tests the bus traveled 130-145 miles under typical city bus driving conditions, including stop and go, acceleration and constant speed. The average normal full day cycle for New York City buses is less than 90 miles. The Company believes that all-electric buses utilizing Electric Fuel's Co. Zinc-Air technology have sufficient range to offer a practical alternative to diesel-powered buses.

 


Advanced Power and Energy Sources Transportation (APET) in Hong Kong. According to them, the Salamander and the cordless EV are about to step out of myth and into reality.

APET’s revolution centres upon how zinc air batteries can power EVs. The technology is proven on the small scale: hearing aid battery adverts dominate any Google search for “zinc air battery”.

Furthermore, as zinc air batteries need only zinc, air and water to produce electricity they are likely the most environmentally friendly ones around.

However, upscaling the technology from a hearing aid to a car has always been a problem. Until now.

A Swiss company ReVolt, of Staefa, says it has developed rechargeable zinc-air batteries that can store three times the energy of lithium ion batteries, by volume, while costing only half as much.
  In the late 1980s they were considered one of the most promising battery technologies because of their high theoretical energy-storage capacity, says Gary Henriksen, manager of the electrochemical energy storage department at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois. The battery chemistry is also relatively safe because it doesn't require volatile materials, so zinc-air batteries are not prone to catching fire like lithium-ion batteries.
They are starting to develop large-format batteries for electric vehicles. The battery design is based on technology developed at SINTEF, a research institute in Trondheim, Norway. ReVolt was founded to bring it to market and so far has raised 24 million euros in investment. James McDougall, the company's CEO, says that the technology overcomes the main problem with zinc-air rechargeable batteries--that they typically stop working after relatively few charges. If the technology can be scaled up, zinc-air batteries could make electric vehicles more practical by lowering their costs and increasing their range. Unlike conventional batteries, which contain all the reactants needed to generate electricity, zinc-air batteries rely on oxygen from the atmosphere to generate current.

 

These batteries resemble fuel cells, with a zinc slurry forming a liquid zinc electrode, and a series of tubes forming the air electrode. Electricity is generated by pumping the slurry through the tubes, where it is oxidized and releases electrons. The resultant zinc oxide is stored in another compartment and flows back through the tubes when the battery is recharging. This releases oxygen, and the zinc oxide reverts to zinc.

Since the slurry can be in greater volume than the air electrode, the energy density is increased and more electricity is produced. McDougall expects the batteries to last much longer too, for up to 10,000 discharge/recharge cycles. The battery could also be repaired, by replacing failed parts such as the air electrode.


A product designed by:
Bob Anderson, Herb Ault, and
Aaron Hammel has been awarded
the prestigious Engineering Emmy Award.

The chassis, suspension, and electric propulsion systems were initially conceptualized and engineered by:
Bob Anderson, followed by additional tuning and
mechanical engineering to create an optimized and versitile platform for moving camera shots by the three man team. The high performance electric drive system is virtually silent and provides opportunities for incredible and dramatic long takes at speeds over 40 MPH or at a crawl, with no need for the dolly tracking and multiple, short shots.

This electric camera car has been used in a number of major motion pictures such as SPIDERMAN II (Columbia Pic.), CONSTANTINE (Warner Bros.), KICKING & SCREAMING/Universal Pics and The AVIATOR just to name a few as well as television shows such as JAG/Paramount, WANTED/Warner Brothers just to name a few of those and not to mention a number of commercials.


Oh yeah! and it is really great for filming wild life.

Last Friday July 3 2009 Electric Blue Motors of Flagstaff AZ was robbed in what we believe to be one of the largest EV targeted robberies to date.
I've attached a pdf file detailing the robbery. The thieves escaped with over $30,000 worth of batteries, components, computers and tools. The thieves knew exactly what they were doing they even knew how to take apart an EV and
strip out its parts. They did all of this in what we believe to be just a
couple of hours, so obviously there were multiple members of this robbery.
For anyone who's had to lug around batteries and motors you know how heavy
and difficult it can be to move these components.

Were asking everyone that receiving this to please print out a copy of this
attachment and take it to your EAA meeting and discus this new threat to the
EV industry. Obviously if you believe that you know the people responsible
for this crime we suggest that you contact your local law enforcement. There
is a substantial reward for anyone helping in the recovery of our stolen items.

 



Due to the nature of the robbery our insurance will not cover any of the
stolen items, most of these items were bought by our customers and we are
now responsible for replacing all of them.If you have the ability to post this file on your web site or any
publication that would be greatly appreciated, the more publicity on this
issue the better.

We did not have a security system in place so it was easy for these thieves
to walk in and out with no interruption, if you carry a large amount of
inventory as we did we suggest that you get a security system installed
immediately.

Together lets make this the last EV targeted robbery.

The list of items missing will be available on our web site tomorrow. http://www.electricbluemotors.com

Thank You,

Dustin Donahue,

Manager Direct:928-527-4662 ex: 201

Connect Tech International , Electric Blue Motors

Grassroots Electric Vehicles is a certified dealer of Electric Blue Motors

Off The Pump and on the Grid
   
Bloomfield, N.Y. — Conversions for Sale
Mark Thorn in East Bloomfield and Mike Young in Newark drive reconditioned electric vehicles, calling them the most efficient cars on the road today.
Passing over new hybrid cars and expensive electric-only cars such as the Tesla sports car, Young and Thorn drive used electrics.
“The motors in these cars last over a million miles,” Young said. He finds dead ’90s-vintage electric cars and trucks like Ford’s Ranger and the Chevy S-10, changes out exhausted batteries, and puts them back on the road, said Young, a school bus driver in Newark by day.
“When it comes to an all-battery-powered electric car, most people still just laugh. They are skeptical,” he said. But, he noted, “Average Americans drive about 26 miles a day,” well inside the range of an electric car. Older electric vehicles, or EVs for short, can be perfect second vehicles. But the distance between some Thruway service areas is enough to park an old EV on the shoulder with dead batteries and many such cars can’t hold the 65 mph Thruway speed limit. Newer EVs, like the Mini-E and Tesla, have no problem keeping up.

To charge his car, Thorn has a 10-kilowatt wind generator at his home. The windmill, which is tied to the grid so he can sell extra power or draw it on still days, cost him $28,000. Young has grid-tied rooftop photovoltaic panels that cost $23,000 to install. They each pay just $20 a month to stay connected to the grid, run their houses and charge electric cars. Without an alternative power system, you can still charge an electric car at home, but expect to see an additional $30 a month on your electric bill.

Batteries included
Thorn recently settled in with his first electric vehicle, a 1986 electric blue Nissan 300ZX with a 30-mile range. It has nearly a ton of lead-acid batteries under the hood and in what was once the back seat. After buying his windmill last year, Thorn had excess power. He shopped the Internet and found the $12,000 sports coupe from Florida EV specialist Greenshed Conversions and had the car shipped to East Bloomfield. Driving north with recharging stops would have taken too long.Thorn commutes over country roads six miles to Constellation Wines U.S. in Canandaigua from his Brace Road home and runs local errands in his EV.
When he turns his car key, the Nissan emits a steady frrp, frrp, frrp noise. “The electric hydraulic brake pump,” he explained. The car has no fan belts or accessory drives driven by an internal combustion engine. Turning onto Brace Road, Thorn’s EV behaves normally. But head up a steep hill, which can triple the load on the batteries, and the born-again Nissan clings to 40 miles an hour for dear life.
Sometimes at blind country intersections, Thorn rolls the driver window down and listens for oncoming cars before crossing. “I try to drive it like my Model A Ford,” said Thorn.

Going electric Thorn bought his car from Greenshed Conversions, a one-man shop near Fort Pierce, Fla. For around $20,000, depending on battery choice, Greenshed will take a vehicle, remove the gas engine and install the batteries, motor and electric components needed to go 100 percent electric.

 

During last summer’s gas crisis, Greenshed’s Steve Clunn could not keep up with demand.
“It was crazy. When it finally stopped, it was, ‘Thank God, I can catch my breath now,’” said Clunn.
He thinks of an EV conversion as environmentally sound.

“We’re keeping another (gas) car from being built by converting. The conversion will be good for another 100,000 miles,” he said.

Clunn sold Mark Thorn his Nissan after the first owner tired of the car. Some cars convert better than others. The Nissan, while aerodynamic, has a problem: “It is too heavy. But he (Thorn) got a really good deal,” said Clunn.

The 54-year-old Clunn began in EVs as a hobbyist and then quit his job last year to do conversions full time. “I started 14 years ago after the first Gulf War, and that was my reason — seeing overdependence on foreign oil and wanting to do something. I discovered then that this whole electric-car movement had been going on for years.”

Clunn touches on world politics, backyard wrench-turning, and high-energy physics all in support of EVs.

“Every dollar of gas you buy costs taxpayers another dollar or more to defend it with the wars we fight to keep it, another dollar to clean up the environment, and another dollar in health care to fix the impact on our health,” said Clunn.

Clunn usually advises simple, cheap setups in lightweight cars as daily drivers. This might produce sleepy performance but results in the lowest driving costs.

“Mark Thorn has the cheapest batteries you can get: six-volt lead-acid ... $2,500 for 26 batteries,” he said. If Thorn’s car goes 25,000 miles, that’s a dollar per 100 miles, a cost that won’t change with the fortunes of oil.

Newer lithium batteries are one-fifth the weight of lead-acid and have 10 times the life span.
High-tech lithium cells “are the absolute best battery, highest performance, highest cost,” Clunn said.
An EV needs some maintenance. “These (battery banks) are like Christmas tree lights, and as they age it’s sometimes hard to keep them going. A major short of some sort can knock one out.”

On the other hand, forget about oil changes, spark plugs and exhaust or emissions system repair.
Whatever electric parts you choose to juice up your old wheels, they are likely to be made in the U.S.A., Clunn noted.
“The motors are from Illinois. The controllers are being made in Texas, the batteries are American,” he said. “What if every town in America began converting cars headed to junkyards to electric vehicles instead? What an idea that is!”

Health risks of shipping pollution have been 'underestimated'
John Vidal, environment editor guardian.co.uk, Thurs. 9 April 2009

One tanker can emit almost the same amount of cancer and asthma-causing chemicals as 50m cars, governments have been underestimating the health risks from shipping pollution following research which shows that one giant container ship can emit almost the same amount of cancer and asthma-causing chemicals as 50m cars. 90,000 cargo ships travel the world's oceans.

Maritime industry insiders based on engine size and the quality of fuel typically used by ships and cars shows that just 15 of the world's biggest ships may now emit as much pollution as all the world's 760m cars. Low-grade ship bunker fuel (or fuel oil) has up to 2,000 times the sulphur content of diesel fuel used in US and European automobiles.

Pressure is mounting on the UN's International Maritime Organisation and the EU to tighten laws governing ship emissions following the decision by the US government last week to impose a strict 230-mile buffer zone along the entire US coast, a move that is expected to be followed by Canada.

 

The setting up of a low emission shipping zone follows US academic research which showed that pollution from the world's 90,000 cargo ships leads to 60,000 deaths a year in the US alone and costs up to $330bn per year in health costs from lung and heart diseases. The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates the buffer zone, which could be in place by next year, will save more than 8,000 lives a year with new air quality standards cutting sulphur in fuel by 98%, particulate matter by 85% and nitrogen oxide emissions by 80%.

The new study by the Danish government's environmental agency adds to this picture. It suggests that shipping emissions cost the Danish health service almost £5bn a year, mainly treating cancers and heart problems. A previous study estimated that 1,000 Danish people die prematurely each year because of shipping pollution. No comprehensive research has been carried out on the effects on UK coastal communities, but the number of deaths is expected to be much higher.

Full article click here: http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2009/apr/09/shipping-pollution

  The University of Nevada-Las Vegas (UNLV) hosted its annual Earth Day Exhibition on Wednesday, April 22nd from 9 AM to 1 PM. School children from surrounding campuses were bused in with their teachers and parent chaperones to tour the event.Gail Lucas, co-founder and former President of the Las Vegas Electric Auto Association (LVEAA),a predecessor to the Las Vegas Electric Vehicle Association (LVEVA), had once again helped organize a display of electric vehicles as part of the exhibition. Members of the LVEVA who participated with their time and vehicles for the display included: Vice-President Lloyd Reece with a 1981 Lectra Motors Centauri Board of Director member Dan Trujillo with a 1981 Lectra Motors Centauri, Jon Hallquist, Bob MacNamara,
Stan Hanel

CBS Announced today March 19 2009
After touring the Edison Electric Vehicle Technical Center in Pomona, California today, President Obama announced an outlay of $2.4 billion is stimulus funds meant to encourage the production of next generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and advanced battery components for such vehicles.

“I am announcing that the Department of Energy is launching a $2 billion competitive grant program under the Recovery Act that will spark the manufacturing of the batteries and parts that run these cars, build or upgrade the factories that will produce them, and in the process, create thousands of jobs right here in America,” the president said.

He added that the government is “making a $400 million down-payment on the infrastructure necessary to get these cars on the road; and because these cars won’t leave the showroom unless consumers buy them, the Recovery Act includes a new tax credit of $7,500 to encourage Americans to plug one in at home.”

“Show us that your idea or your company is best-suited to meet America’s challenges, and we will give you a chance to prove it,” the president said, adding that “every company that wants a shot at these tax dollars has to prove their worth.”

PRESIDENT OBAMA: It is good to be back in California. It’s always nice to get out of Washington for a little while and recharge your batteries. You know a little bit about that here. And I want to thank the folks here at the Electric Vehicle Technical Center for the tour we just had.

Yesterday, I was in Costa Mesa talking with folks about this economic downturn we’re in – a downturn that’s hitting this state as much as any. One in ten Californians are out of work and actively looking for jobs. And the foreclosure crisis has had a devastating impact on Southern California in particular. But Californians aren’t just bearing the brunt of this crisis – you’re doing what needs to be done to overcome it.

This workshop is a perfect example of that. Day by day, test by test, trial by painstaking trial; the scientists, engineers, and workers at this site are developing the ideas and innovations that our future depend upon. It is your ingenuity that will help create the new jobs and new industries of tomorrow.

It isn’t easy. There are days, I’m sure, when progress seems fleeting, and days when it feels like you’re making no progress at all. But often, our greatest discoveries are born not in a flash of brilliance, but in the crucible of a deliberate effort over time. And often, they take something more than imagination and dedication alone – often they take an investment from government. That’s how we sent a man to the moon. That’s how we were able to launch a world wide web. And it’s how we’ll build the clean energy economy that’s the key to our competitiveness in the 21st century.

We’ll do this because we know that the nation that leads on energy will be the nation that leads the world in the 21st century. That’s why, around the world, nations are racing to lead in these industries of the future. Germany is leading the world in solar power. Spain generates almost 30 percent of its power by harnessing the wind, while we manage less than one percent. And Japan is producing the batteries that currently power American hybrid cars.

So the problem isn’t a lack of technology. You’re producing the technology right here. The problem is that, for decades, we have avoided doing what must be done as a nation to turn challenge into opportunity. As a consequence, we import more oil today than we did on 9/11. The 1908 Model T earned better gas mileage than a typical SUV sold in 2008. And even as our economy has been transformed by new forms of technology, our electric grid looks largely the same as it did half a century ago.

So we have a choice to make. We can remain one of the world’s leading importers of foreign oil, or we can make the investments that will allow us to become the world’s leading exporter of renewable energy. We can let climate change continue to go unchecked, or we can help stem it. We can let the jobs of tomorrow be created abroad, or we can create those jobs right here in America and lay the foundation for our lasting prosperity.

That is what my recovery plan does. It will create or save 3.5 million jobs – nearly 400,000 of them right here in California – in part by making investments in areas critical to our long-term growth.

And that is the forward-thinking purpose of the budget I have submitted to Congress. It’s a budget that makes hard choices about where to save and where to spend; that makes overdue investments in education, health care, and yes, energy – investments that will catalyze innovation and industry, creating green jobs and launching clean, renewable energy companies right here in California.

In the next three years, we will double this nation’s supply of renewable energy. We have also made the largest investment in basic research funding in American history – an investment that will spur not only new discoveries in energy, but breakthroughs in science and technology.

We will invest fifteen billion dollars a year to develop technologies like wind power and solar power; advanced biofuels, clean coal, and more fuel-efficient cars and trucks that are built right here in America.

 

We will soon lay down thousands of miles of power lines that can carry new energy to cities and towns across this country. We will put Americans to work making our homes and buildings more efficient so that we can save billions of dollars on our energy bills, just like you’ve done in California for decades. And we will put one million plug-in hybrid vehicles on America’s roads by 2015.

Because these cars of tomorrow require the batteries of tomorrow, I am announcing that the Department of Energy is launching a $2 billion competitive grant program under the Recovery Act that will spark the manufacturing of the batteries and parts that run these cars, build or upgrade the factories that will produce them, and in the process, create thousands of jobs right here in America.

Show us that your idea or your company is best-suited to meet America’s challenges, and we will give you a chance to prove it. And just because I’m here today doesn’t exempt all of you from that challenge – every company that wants a shot at these tax dollars has to prove their worth.

We are also making a $400 million down-payment on the infrastructure necessary to get these cars on the road; and because these cars won’t leave the showroom unless consumers buy them, the Recovery Act includes a new tax credit of $7,500 to encourage Americans to plug one in at home.

True to form, California has already forged ahead with its own plans rather than wait for Washington. It’s fitting that the state home to the first freeway and the first gas station is already at work devising the next freeway and the next gas station. This “green freeway” you’re planning with Oregon and Washington would link your states with a network of rest stops that allow you to do more than just grab a cup of coffee; but also charge your car, refuel it with hydrogen or biofuels, or swap out a battery in the time it takes to fill a gas tank. Charging stations have begun to pop up around downtown San Francisco, and that city has joined with San Jose and Oakland with the vision of becoming the “electric vehicle capital of the United States.”

Here at Southern California Edison, and all across the country, in factories and laboratories, at the Big Three and at small startups, these innovations are taking place right now. In Michigan, and Ohio, and right here in California, we are seeing exciting developments in this field as hardworking men and women are already laying the groundwork for this new industry. Even as our American automakers are undergoing a painful recalibration, they are retooling and reimagining themselves into an industry that can compete and win, because millions of jobs depend on it.

This is the critical work you’re doing. But it’s just one component of what must be a comprehensive energy plan. That’s why we are making an $11 billion investment in upgrading our power grid, so that it can carry renewable energy from the far-flung places that harness or produce it to the cities that use it. That’s why we will create jobs retrofitting millions of homes and cutting energy use in federal buildings by one quarter, saving the American taxpayer $1.5 billion each year.

These are challenging times, but we know we can do this. It won’t come without cost, nor will it be easy. We’ve got 240 million cars already on the road. We’ve got to upgrade the world’s largest energy grid while it’s already in use. And other countries aren’t standing around and waiting for us; they are forging ahead with their own bold energy plans.

But we have faced tough challenges before. And at our best, we have never relied on hope and chance alone. Time and again, we have tapped those great American resources: industriousness and ingenuity. That, after all, is what California is all about. This is a state that has always drawn people who’ve had their eyes set on the horizon; who’ve always dreamed of a future that others thought beyond reach. That is the spirit that you are reclaiming here at the Electric Vehicle Test Center, and that is the spirit we need to reclaim all across this country. Thank you.

  Al Gore is President Obama's second VP and is onboard with his Repower America organization. you'll find the article and link below and the youtube video to the left<<
click here to Check out our solar page

Larry Wexler aka Larry Lightning from Orlando Florida is competing for the automotive X-Prize http://www.progressiveautoxprize.org/

He made a grand showing at the Battery Beach Blowout in in Jupiter, FL at Florida Atlantic University February 21st and 22nd, it can go over 50 mph on fully charged batteries 15 mph directly off the solar panels on a sunny day.
click here for video clip of Larry's solar cycle last year



https://secure.repoweramerica.org
President-elect Barack Obama met with Al Gore to discuss global warming and energy policy. Mr. Obama said he is in agreement with Mr. Gore on the science of climate change. Mr. Obama, repeated his declaration that the United States can no longer afford delay or denial in confronting the climate challenge. "We all believe what the scientists have been telling us for years now, that this is a matter of urgency and national security. The Repower America Initiative is to take aggressive action quickly shifting America to renewable energy sources investing billions of dollars to green energy projects that will create jobs and help reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Louis got married at a drive through chapel in Vegas

Grassroots
Electric Vehicles

Crystal River, Florida

Grassroots
Electric Vehicles

Las Vegas, Nevada
Ph#: 772-971-0533 Ph#: 702-277-7544

Drive against global warming:
Solar taxi in India: click here to watch the video
Louis Palmer is traveling around the world without polluting it.
His three-wheel taxi with a gearless electric motor runs on twin 380 volt batteries that allow it to accelerate up to 90 kilometers per hour. They are charged from solar cells carried on a trailer.
www.solartaxi.com